Scientists for the first time witness collision of two neutron stars, also finds how gold is formed

 

Scientists for the first time detected both the ripples in space and time and the light produced and emitted during the same cosmic event: the spectacular collision of two neutron stars.

The discovery would soon reveal secrets of the cosmos, including how gold was created.

Neutron stars, formed when massive stars explode in supernovas, are the smallest, densest stars known to exist. A teaspoon of a neutron star has a mass of about a billion tons.

The collision of neutron stars is known as a kilonova — an explosion similar to a supernova but on a smaller scale.

The crash generated a fierce burst of gamma rays and a gravitational wave, a faint ripple in the fabric of space and time first theorized by Albert Einstein a century ago.

“This is the one we’ve all been waiting for,” said David Reitze of CalTech Continue reading “Scientists for the first time witness collision of two neutron stars, also finds how gold is formed”

ECOWAS Court orders Nigerian govt to pay $75,000 to family of dead military cadet

 

The ECOWAS Court of Justice has ordered the Nigerian government to pay $75, 000 to the family of a deceased cadet of the Nigerian army, Elshadai Kwasu, for alleged violation of the deceased right to life.

The deceased, a 19-year-old military cadet, died during the conduct of a waterman-ship training in April 2015.

Following his death, the late cadet’s father, Danladi Kwasu, approached the court to demand the invocation of relevant sections of the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights on the grounds of alleged violation of his child’s right to life.

Continue reading “ECOWAS Court orders Nigerian govt to pay $75,000 to family of dead military cadet”

U.S. median household income rose 3.2% to $59,039 in 2016; the nation’s poverty rate fell 0.8 percentage points to 12.7%

Americans notched solid financial gains in 2016 for a second straight year as household incomes rose, poverty fell and fewer people went without health insurance, signaling an end to the stagnation that had lingered since the Great Recession.

The median U.S. household income climbed 3.2% to $59,039, the Census Bureau said Tuesday. That followed growth of 5.2% in 2015, the largest on records dating to 1968. The combined increase over the past two years is the biggest such rise since the 1960s.

“Real median household income has finally completed its nine-year slog of digging out of the ditch,” says IHS Markit economist Chris Christopher.

The median, inflation-adjusted income of $59,000 last year surpassed the level in 1999 as the highest on record, but Census officials discouraged Continue reading “U.S. median household income rose 3.2% to $59,039 in 2016; the nation’s poverty rate fell 0.8 percentage points to 12.7%”

President Trump says North Korea’s test of a hydrogen bomb is “very hostile and dangerous to the United States

 

North Korea’s state-run broadcaster said Sunday the country had successfully conducted a test of a hydrogen bomb that can be loaded onto its new intercontinental ballistic missiles.

The nuclear test was estimated to have a strength of 100 kilotons, according to South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency, citing South Korean lawmaker Kim Young-woo, chief of the parliament’s defense committee.

That yield would be five-to-10 times more powerful than North Korea’s previous test in 2016 — and about five times the power of the bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II.

There was no immediate confirmation outside North Korea that the test involved a hydrogen bomb, or that it could be loaded onto a missile.

the United States and other experts in the West.

The latest test, however, appears to mark a significant step forward in the North’s quest for a viable nuclear missile capable of striking anywhere in the United States.

Continue reading “President Trump says North Korea’s test of a hydrogen bomb is “very hostile and dangerous to the United States”

U.S. scientists fix disease genes in human embryos for 1st time

 

For the first time, scientists working in a U.S. lab have used gene editing to correct a disease-causing mutation in viable human embryos, according to scientific paper published Wednesday.

The work, reported in  Nature, could be a step toward genetically modified babies. But the altered embryos created in the study were quickly destroyed and never intended to be implanted in a woman — a step that would be illegal under current regulations in the United States and many other countries.

Still, the experiment moves the idea of tinkering with genes before birth “from future fantasy to the world of possibility,” said Peter Braude, an emeritus professor of obstetrics and gynecology at King’s College London.

Safety and ethical questions remain, Braude and other experts not involved in the research said. And the technique has not been perfected enough to warrant moving forward.

“We still have room to improve,” said Shoukhrat Mitalipov, a researcher at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), Portland and lead author of the paper.

Here’s what Mitalipov and his colleagues, including scientists in the United States, South Korea and China, did:

Continue reading “U.S. scientists fix disease genes in human embryos for 1st time”

President Trump signs new Russia sanctions, questions whether bill interferes with foreign policy authority

 

President Trump has signed a new package of sanctions against Russia, Iran and North Korea, but issued a blistering statement insisting that the bill encroaches on the executive branch’s ability to conduct foreign policy.

“Since this bill was first introduced, I have expressed my concerns to Congress about the many ways it improperly encroaches on executive power, disadvantages American companies, and hurts the interests of our European allies,” Trump wrote in a statement as he signed the bill, which the Senate approved last week.

While Trump said his administration worked with Congress to make the bill better, he notes the legislation “remains seriously flawed – particularly because it encroaches on the executive branch’s authority to negotiate.”

Continue reading “President Trump signs new Russia sanctions, questions whether bill interferes with foreign policy authority”

Indonesia ombudsman finds rights violations in execution of Nigerian

The office of Indonesia’s ombudsman has unearthed evidence of rights violations in the execution of a Nigerian drug convict in 2016, an official said on Friday.

Humphrey Jefferson was still seeking clemency from President Joko Widodo at the time of his execution, which meant he still had a chance of being pardoned, said Ninik Rahayu, an official of the ombudsman’s office who is overseeing the case.

Mr. Jefferson, sentenced to death in 2004, had also sought a second judicial review of his case by the Supreme Court, but his request was denied by the Central Jakarta court without proper explanation, Rahayu said, in what she called maladministration.

If the court had taken on Mr. Jefferson’s case, his execution would have had to be delayed until its final verdict. Continue reading “Indonesia ombudsman finds rights violations in execution of Nigerian”

Here are some of the people who are affected by trumps travel ban after supreme court rule

Supreme Court Travel Ban Announcement

The Supreme Court delivered a mixed ruling on Monday that will allow President Trump to implement his travel ban against six Muslim majority nations — but only for visitors lacking ties to the United States.

The court ruled that Trump may bar people from six majority Muslim countries — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — if they have no “bona fide” relationship to the U.S. Those that have established ties will be allowed to continue entering the country, which covers the majority of visitors from those countries.

More than 100,000 people legally entered the U.S. from the six countries in fiscal 2016, which ended last Sept. 30, according to State Department data.

Nearly 30,000 had immigrant visas, more than 25,000 arrived as refugees and thousands more came on student, diplomatic and research visas that Continue reading “Here are some of the people who are affected by trumps travel ban after supreme court rule”

Trump says he prefers rich persons to be in charge of the economy

U.S. President Donald Trump said he wouldn’t want a poor person in charge of the economy, as he defended his cabinet, which is thought to be the wealthiest in the country’s history.

“Somebody said, ‘Why did you appoint a rich person to be in charge of the economy?’” he told supporters at rally in Iowa.

“So I said …. because that’s the kind of thinking we want… because they’re representing the country.”

Making a particular reference to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, a Continue reading “Trump says he prefers rich persons to be in charge of the economy”